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breelandwalker:

fangirling-daily:

fat-pikachu-mas:



denise-puchol:



Comic Book Readers
orkin 1947



what’s this?
Little girls read comics from the very beginning of their incarnation??





“Girl reading comic book in newsstand” by Teenie Harris (c. 1940-1945) © 2006 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

That sound you hear is thousands of wangsting sexist fanboys shrieking in horror.
Suck it.

breelandwalker:

fangirling-daily:

fat-pikachu-mas:

denise-puchol:

Comic Book Readers

orkin 1947

what’s this?

Little girls read comics from the very beginning of their incarnation??

image

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“Girl reading comic book in newsstand” by Teenie Harris (c. 1940-1945) © 2006 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

That sound you hear is thousands of wangsting sexist fanboys shrieking in horror.

Suck it.

(via sleepwalkerindreamersclothing)

adele-dazeems-cheekbones:

krystal-cage:

Some people were a little confused so I made this.

Good, I thought I was the only one to think this

(via sleepwalkerindreamersclothing)

imthefinal3patchproblem:

this would make a lovely converse commercial

imthefinal3patchproblem:

this would make a lovely converse commercial

(via masturbateblaine)

theklainenewsweek: day six - because they make me laugh

(via klainer101)

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

(via sleepwalkerindreamersclothing)

fascinates:

do you ever feel like having too many feelings that you just might explode

(via pizza)

egobus:

Brave is a very emotional movie for Clint  

egobus:

Brave is a very emotional movie for Clint  

(via sleepwalkerindreamersclothing)

"I don’t have a problem with gay people I just don’t want them throwing it in my face"

misandry-mermaid:

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Uh…… you mean like this?

(via guy)

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

I just wanna have abs…olutely all the pasta and breadsticks

(via guy)